Data by State


Wisconsin


State's Child Welfare Agency
Wisconsin Department of Children and Families

RESOURCES

Selected Child Welfare Data from FFY08
WISCONSINStateNational
# of children in out-of-home care*  7,616 468,431
Rate out of home (per 1000 in child population) 5.8 6.3
Entries to out-of-home care** 4,812 267,437
Rate of entry (per 1000 in child population) 3.7 3.6
Exits from out-of-home care**  3,982 274,100
% of children in out-of-home care placed with relatives* 29.9% 24.1%
% of children exiting out-of-home care to relatives or guardianship** 5.0% 15.2%
% of youth age 12-18 with APPLA goal* 20.1% 20.1%
% of youth aging out (% of all exits)** 9.4% 10.0%

Use of kin placements to divert from foster care/custody

Wisconsin: State does not have a set policy on placing with kin to avoid custody after an investigation of abuse and/or neglect (1 state) (LEARN MORE)

See More Child Welfare Data for Wisconsin

 

The data in the "Child Welfare Financing (2010)" section were compiled from the 2008/2010 Casey Child Welfare Financing Survey and the 2007 Casey Child Welfare Financing Survey. The state fiscal year (SFY) 2008 for most states was July 1, 2007 through July 30, 2008.


Total Expenditures

Total Federal Funds

Title IV-E (all-programs)

Title IV-E Foster Care

Title IV-E Adoption Assistance

Title IV-E Chafee/ETVs

Title IV-E Demonstration Waivers

Title IV-E Guardianship Assistance

Title IV-B

Medicaid

Social Services Block Grant (SSBG)

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Other Federal and Third Party Funds

Total State Funds

Total Local Funds

The data in the "Child Welfare Financing (2008)" section were compiled from the 2008/2010 Casey Child Welfare Financing Survey and the 2007 Casey Child Welfare Financing Survey. The state fiscal year (SFY) 2008 for most states was July 1, 2007 through July 30, 2008.


Total Expenditures

Total Federal Funds

Title IV-E (all-programs)

Title IV-E Foster Care

Title IV-E Adoption Assistance

Title IV-E Chafee/ETVs

Title IV-E Demonstration Waivers

Title IV-B

Medicaid

Social Services Block Grant (SSBG)

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Other Federal and Third Party Funds

Total State Funds

Total Local Funds

The data in the "Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect" section are derived from Child Welfare Information Gateway's State Statutes Series. Child Welfare Information Gateway is a service of the Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For additional information on state statutes related to the definition of child abuse and neglect and other child welfare topics, please visit: http://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/state.


Physical Abuse

Neglect

Sexual Abuse

Emotional Abuse

Parental Substance Abuse

Abandonment

Standards for Reporting

Person Responsible for the Child

Exceptions

The data in the "Differential Response" section are derived from the National Quality Improvement Center (QIC) on Differential Response in Child Protective Services, operated by the American Humane Association under a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children's Bureau. The data from a 2009 survey of states were summarized in the report, "Online Survey of State Differential Response Policies and Practices Findings Report" (June 2009). The QIC has received updated information for certain states since the survey was conducted, and that information is reflected here whenever possible. For additional information on state policies related to differential response, please access the report at: http://www.differentialresponseqic.org/assets/docs/qic-dr-findings-report-jun09.pdf.


Status & Scope of implementation

DR Pathways

Pathway Assignment Protocols

Criteria for Assignment to DR pathway

Substantiation of maltreatment through DR

Reporting to NCANDS

DR Eligibility for Children in Foster Care/Juvenile Court

Codification in Statute, Policy, & Protocols

Services Provided through DR Pathways

  • Services provided through DR pathways
    • Parenting Classes: Yes
    • Substance Abuse Programs: Yes
    • Family Counseling: Yes
    • Advocacy Services: Yes
    • Medical and/or Dental Services: Yes
    • Child Care: Yes
    • Home Cleaning Help: Yes
    • Services Related to Economic Hardship: Yes
    • Other: Yes

The data in the "Domestic Violence" section are derived from Child Welfare Information Gateway's State Statutes Series. Child Welfare Information Gateway is a service of the Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For additional information on state statutes related to domestic violence and other child welfare topics, please visit: http://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/state.


Definitions of Domestic Violence

Witnesses to Domestic Violence

The data in this "Fostering Connections Policies" section are derived from the FosteringConnections.org project, a collaboration of nonprofit partner organizations managed by Child Trends with the goal of promoting timely and thoughtful implementation of the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act. For additional information about implementation of the Act, please visit: www.fosteringconnections.org.


Kinship Guardianship Assistance Programs

Extension of Care Beyond 18

The data in the "Kinship Care Policies" section were compiled from the 2007 Casey Kinship Foster Care Policy Survey. For additional information on state laws and legislation related to kin caregivers, please visit the Grandfamilies State Law and Policy Resource Center, at: http://www.grandfamilies.org/.


Definition of Kin

Locating Kin

  • Diligent search resources to locate kin
    • Engagement with the Child and/or the Child's Network: No
    • Use of Professional Search Services: No
    • Diligent Search Units or Workers: No
    • Web Searches: No
    • Local/State/Federal Databases: No
    • Other: Yes

Private Kin Arrangements

Kin Placements as a Diversion from Foster Care

  • Use of kin placements to divert from foster care/custody : State does not have a set policy on placing with kin to avoid custody after an investigation of abuse and/or neglect (1 state)
  • More Information for Wisconsin:

    POLICIES INVOLVING KIN PLACEMENTS TO DIVERT CHILDREN FROM FOSTER CARE  

    Following an investigation, if a caseworker determines that a child cannot remain safely at home, there is no agency policy which determines whether caseworkers are allowed to identify relatives who can care for the child to avoid taking, or without having to take, the child into state custody. The following text lists examples of what would be done in practice.

    The practice in this scenario would depend on the safety situation with the home. If the relative can care for the child safely and contact with the parent(s) is not a safety concern, the agency may opt to allow the relative to care for the child without a formal placement. In most cases, however, the agency would take physical custody of the child, open a case, and place the child with the relative. The agency would assess the safety of the relative placement in order to assure the relative can or will protect the child from any unauthorized access by the abusing parent.

    Assessments Conducted: Wisconsin policy directs caseworkers to assess safety in relative placements. As a part of the assessment process, the county agency also completes a background check. The assessment must be documented in Wisconsin's automated child welfare data system (eWiSACWIS).

    Assistance with Legal Custody: The county agency may assist the relatives with obtaining legal custody. However, under Wisconsin law, legal custody should be transferred from the parent only if there is no less drastic alternative.

    Reunification Services: Reunification services would be provided to the child's custodial parent if the case was opened with the agency.

    Adjudication*: The agency typically would not seek adjudication unless the situation required it for the safety of the child or the agency wanted to provide the relative caregiver with a foster care payment and a voluntary placement agreement was not, for some reason, advisable or practical.

     

    *Adjudication is the court's affirmation of the findings of the investigation conducted by the child welfare agency and places the findings on record in case another situation causes the child to come into state custody

Licensure Options for Kin

Payment of Kin Caring for Children in State Custody

Guardianship Policies

Placement with Noncustodial Parents

The data in the "Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect" section are derived from Child Welfare Information Gateway's State Statutes Series. Child Welfare Information Gateway is a service of the Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For additional information on state statutes related to mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect and other child welfare topics, please visit: http://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/state.


Types of Mandatory Reporters

  • Persons required to report: Only specific professionals designated as mandatory reporters in statute (33 states)
  • Professionals specified as mandatory reporters
    • Any Person Required to Report: No
    • Commercial film/photograph processors: No
    • Substance abuse counselors: Yes
    • Probation or parole officers: No
    • Domestic violence workers: No
    • Animal control or humane officers: No
    • Court-appointed special advocates: Yes
    • Clergy: Yes

Exceptions for Privileged Communications

Protection of Reporter's Identity

Dworksy, A. & Havlicek, J. (2009). Review of State Policies and Programs to Support Young People Transitioning Out of Foster Care. Chicago: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. Some data from TN and NM was provided to Child Trends upon follow up with state staff.


Foster Care Age Limits

Circumstances in which Youth can Stay in Care Past 18th Birthday

Requirements Youth Must Comply with to Stay in Care Past 18th Birthday

Circumstances in which Youth Can Stay in Care Past 19th Birthday

  • All-state overview: Circumstances to stay in care past 19th birthday
    • Youth is on track to graduate high school or get GED: Yes
    • Youth is enrolled in college : Yes
    • Youth has disabilities or special needs: Yes
    • Youth is receiving mental health or sub. abuse treatment: Yes
    • Youth is pregnant: Yes
    • Youth is parenting: Yes
    • Court determines it is in youth's best interest: Yes
    • Youth petitions court to remain in care: Yes
    • Other: Yes

Requirements Youth Must Comply with to Stay in Care Past 19th Birthday

  • All-state overview: Requirements for staying in care past 19th birthday
    • Youth must sign voluntary placement agreement: Yes
    • Youth must live in licensed or approved placement: Yes
    • Youth must be employed: Yes
    • Youth must be enrolled in school: Yes
    • Youth must be employed OR enrolled in school: Yes
    • Youth must pay portion of room and board: Yes
    • Youth must participate in services and comply with case plan: Yes
    • No requirements of youth: Yes
    • Other: Yes

Court Jurisdiction After 18

Supervised Independent Living Placements

Re-entry into Foster Care

Chafee Foster Care Independence Program

State-funded Independent Living (IL)/Transition Services